10 Things All Mothers Worry About

A mother’s work is never done – that’s an indisputable fact. We ask some of our readers what their main concerns are. Do you share the same worries?

photo credit: ingimage

 

 

1. SAFETY

“I am very concerned about my child’s safety, be it at school or in public places. Malaysia has become extremely dangerous, with cases of snatch theft and kidnapping on the rise. Reading the newspaper just increases the fear and I have to constantly be vigilant.” 

– Corine Yee, 38

 

2. SOCIAL NETWORK

“Children today are exposed to the Internet and social media sites such as Facebook at a very young age. They easily know how to find information online, watch movies and play online games without any trouble. As a mother, I worry about what goes on when they use the computer and I have to constantly monitor their activities to ensure nothing goes wrong.”

-Ayu Rafikah, 35

 

3. BAD HABITS

“I am concerned about the habits my children could pick up. As we all know, children learn by imitating others and I worry that my child will pick up less-than-flattering habits from family members and older peers. As a mother, I would love our children to be able to select good habits to follow but we all know that this is next to impossible.”

– Daphne Tan, 35

 

4. QUALITY TIME

“My biggest worry is not having enough time to spend with my children, thus missing all the important occasions in their lives. I took a new job a few years back where I had to stay back at work almost every day. It gave me very little time to spend with my son. I came to the realisation that I had not been spending much time with him. That’s when I spoke to my boss and we agreed on a new work arrangement.”

-Sara Goh, 36

 

5. THE FUTURE

“I worry about my children’s future and how they will survive in this world. My son, who is borderline ASD (autism spectrum disorder), could look for a job but with only basic skills, would he be able to live on a minimum wage of RM900? In order to believe that he could, I challenge my family to live on RM30 a day. This is assuming our son lives with us. We tried doing it but it is hard!  But I have to learn how to make RM900 a month and make a note of the things I have learnt and teach it to my kids.” 

– Mastura Mustaffa, 42

 

6. EDUCATION

“The education system is below par in all aspects. That the Malay language is the medium of instruction is detrimental to everyone as it hinders progress and advancement. Local exams are only valid in Malaysia and are not a ticket to even Singapore’s higher institutions of learning, let alone overseas.”

– Mee Kuen,58

 

7. COMMUNICATION SKILLS

“Since the rise of tech gadgets, I fear for my children’s mental health due to the type of exposure they are getting from the Internet and online media. Children nowadays spend hours on their smartphones and hardly have face-to-face interaction. Children who are constantly on their tablets do not learn how to conduct face-to-face communication.” 

– Asha Hogue, 53

 

8. PEER PRESSURE

“The way children in this generation are growing up is very different. There is more peer pressure now and children are able to think more independently. Gone are the days when we would obey our parents and not cross the line as a form of respect or even question their actions. Being part of our children’s circle of friends is very important to know their activities and keep a close watch over them.”

– Sonia Haridas, 31

 

9. BABYSITTERS

“As a working mum, I constantly worry about my children’s safety because I am not sure whether they are eating well, learning or are being treated well. It is a big risk leaving our children in the hands of caretakers but we don’t have much of a choice.”

– Celine Chia, 59

 

10. FENDING FOR THEMSELVES

“Growing up in a rough environment, I have never had an issue with learning how to fight for myself. However, I have a feeling my children will struggle to fend for themselves as they have grown up in a protected environment. Will they be able to handle situations like this on their own? I’m worried but there’s nothing I can do except guide them to do what’s right?”

– Amanda Yip, 35